News: Mountain Traditions

Connie Regan-Blake first discovered storytelling as an art form in 1971 at the age of 24. “I ended up falling in love with story-telling,” Regan-Blake says. “Within two weeks I knew I would tell stories for the rest of my life. I never thought I...

News: Asheville Citizen-Times

Thirty-five years ago, Connie Regan-Blake volunteered to tell a story at a storytelling festival in Jonesborough, Tennessee. For her work in popularizing the art of storytelling nationwide, the National Storytelling Network has presented the Asheville resident with...

News: Our State

From the very beginning, telling stories has been the most cherished form of communication. Through stories we share history and heritage, we let our imaginations soar, and we teach the age-old lessons of life. Fast paces changes in technology in the past century have...

News: Johnson City Press

Connie Regan-Blake helped make storytelling history in 1975 when she and her cousin, Barbara Freeman, hit the back roads of America as the Folktellers. Hailing from Asheville, the veteran performer is the upcoming week’s Storytelling Live! Teller-in-Residence at...

News: The Mountain Times

Her recognition stems from “her untiring efforts to increase public awareness of the art, preserve traditional art forms, and for the significant originality of her life’s work.” Regan-Blake’s love for and interest in the lives of such local...